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 CaribbeanChoice : Food, Cooking & Dining : Caribbean Cooking
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vutjebal
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Quote vutjebal Replybullet Posted: 27 Jan 2008 at 2:18pm
wow...harmac....I like hungry  now>>>Nod
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Quote Citizen Eve Replybullet Posted: 27 Jan 2008 at 5:55pm
Originally posted by harmac

i had some yesterday my Bajan friend he is the master of CoCo, but we had it with Grouper fillet he stuffed the fish with shallots and thyme,and tomatoes then add a little butter cover and steam . boiled sweet potatoes to go with it. Girl! it was served with Mount Gay and ginger beer , and to top it off. (we had a similar thing called ducono (blue draws) in jamaica) with a sweet potatoe pone.now that was West Indian.


Nice ... am salivating here ... some sweet potato pone with cocoa tea would be sheer bliss on a cold day like today.
Harmac, do you put black pepper in your sweet potato pone? In Grenada it is a must ... but everyone I know here except my Tobago girlfriend knows nothing of the sort ... gives it a kick I think ... real nice.




Edited by Citizen Eve - 27 Jan 2008 at 5:55pm
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harmac
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Quote harmac Replybullet Posted: 27 Jan 2008 at 6:25pm
I use cayenne, black pepper burns stomach, i love ducono made with ground fresh corn and raisins. By the way just had some stewed down Turbit (ol Wife) with okras and scallion with tomatoes served with Steamed pumpkin, trying to loose weight  i have lost 20 lbs and still going.  I wish i could send you some tropical weather and get some of that blanket one.

Edited by harmac - 27 Jan 2008 at 6:44pm
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Quote harmac Replybullet Posted: 27 Jan 2008 at 6:42pm
This is how i do my fish. I call it Caribbean way LOL I am more a Caribbean person than a special Island person. 

Oven baked fish(Caribbean Way)

  • 4 small or two medium whole gutted turbit/turbot (some times spelt terbit or called Old Wife)
  • 2 medium onions, chopped up
  • 3 sprigs escallions
  • 6 sprigs thyme
  • 8 pimentos
  • 1 table spoon salt
  • 1 garlic
  • 1 scotch bonnet pepper
  • A dash pickapepper sauce or angostoria bitters
  • Wash fish with vinegar or lime juice
  • 1 medium cut up tomatoe
  • ˝ cup water

METHOD:

1.       Wash fish with vinigar or lime juice

2.       Pour pickapepper into bowl

3.       add onion, thyme, escallions, scotch bonnet pepper, garlic & combine also  salt, pepper, pimento and Angostoria bitters.

4.       Dry and place each fish on a sheet of foil

5.       cover each fish with the seasoning mixture making sure the cavity get some

6.       put fish and whatever mixture with water  in a dutchpot ,cover and bake for approx 45 minutes at 350 Degrees

7.       Serves 4 but if you are a Caribbean person its for two.

 



Edited by harmac - 27 Jan 2008 at 6:43pm
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Quote Citizen Eve Replybullet Posted: 27 Jan 2008 at 9:11pm
Originally posted by harmac

I use cayenne, black pepper burns stomach, i love ducono made with ground fresh corn and raisins. By the way just had some stewed down Turbit (ol Wife) with okras and scallion with tomatoes served with Steamed pumpkin, trying to loose weight  i have lost 20 lbs and still going.  I wish i could send you some tropical weather and get some of that blanket one.


Harmac you making me hungry and missing the islands!! Smile
Now am even thinking what am I doing here in this @#$% cold ... my youngest is sixteen and I plan to spend more time at home when all are independent ... at least in university ... means two more years max but I plan to be there this year.

I will have to try cayenne next time in my pone ... In Grenada we call your ducono Konky and yeah thats to die for ... Haven't had any in too many moons ... I sure miss the food and laid back attitude of the folks too ...
Am not familiar with the fish Turbit ... is it like snapper or king? Sounds like a tasty dinner you just put away!

Good for you losing 20 lbs ... am working on my fitness too ... its so important as we get older ... and I need to be careful as my maternal side of the family has been plagued with hyper tension for generations ... I plan to break the cycle ... lifestyle play a big part am told.

Until you figure out how to bottle the tropical weather ... I'll have to settle for the memories!

Thanks for sharing Harmac .... I will try the Harmac fish soon.


"the time is always ripe to do right", Nelson Mandela.
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Quote harmac Replybullet Posted: 28 Jan 2008 at 7:56am

Turbot/turbot is a rather firm flesh fish which is great for coconut dinner (oil Down) the skin is hard and has to be stripped off before cooking. you can try using haddock as a substitute.

Girl i did 30 odd years of New York and had forgotten how fabulous living in the tropics is. Waking up to sunshine and cool breeze, pick a fruit, walking on the beach when you want to, stop by friends and have a beer/ lemonade in the back yard. However the down side too many folks are trying to turn these Islands into another Miami or Toronto. they have to have the latest and greatest to show.
 
Hey give me my good food and sunshine something to do during the day that is not a hassle and that good for me. I work from 9-1PM in an office then i go home to take care of my garden or fall asleep in front of the  TV watching Judge something or the other. get up have a salad, go for a walk or read , visit friends, Get on my Vonage ( I have a US number and a Canadian Number so that it don't cost my friends to call me or I them) and of course get on the computer by 10 i am asleep up at 4:30 or 5:00  cup-pa Blue Mountain Coffee on the porch and watch the sun come up and listen to the annoying roosters crow, the first singing of the birds, then have a ripe Banana or bagel with the second cup of coffee. Then by this my day has started. pick up my grand kid of eight and take him to school then to work spending 1 hour reading News Media on line then 1/2 hour answering emails. So its not a bad life in the tropics  


Edited by harmac - 28 Jan 2008 at 7:58am
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Quote Citizen Eve Replybullet Posted: 28 Jan 2008 at 9:54pm

Harmac ... sounds like paradise for real ... do you think the government is putting the brakes on the negative impact of tourism ... Grenada had for the longest while but things are changing very fast and nowadays the tourist dollar is more in demand! And a lifestyle and culture is being destroyed in the process ... you wonder if it is possible to have a win/win here ... the price seem very high.

I am planning to spend more time in the Caribbean shortly ... I really miss it and still have many family and friends there plus some property we inherited ... a bed and breakfast is what am thinking ... I crave a simpler lifestyle ... like what you are telling me is quite possible ... thanks for sharing. How to you find the cost of living? Have you maintained your health care in US ... my dad did before he passed on and came up periodically for his check ups.



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Quote harmac Replybullet Posted: 29 Jan 2008 at 4:33pm
Regretfully, you don't go into town when the ships come in sometimes there are 5 of them at 2000 each its a mess, i find that terrorist oh i mean tourist are so dumb especially northerners, " does your dog understand English" du "no only Latin" we stay away from the area that they come ashore at. culturally i do realise they ruin the place but folks are so greedy that want the "moola" and they don't care how they get it. that is why we live in the centre of the Islands , tourist generally stay on the beaches. The Americans are friendly the English are starchy but tolerable, but oh gad the Canadians want to boss you around and don't even give locals a chance. As bosses , we give up. Oh but that don't say i have friends from all of these places. LOL I got to protect my butt. today is a bit cloudy hope we get rain, Had some salt fish and and boil potato today , enjoyed it. 
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Quote Citizen Eve Replybullet Posted: 30 Jan 2008 at 5:33am

Balance is really tricky Harmac ... the tourist industry does bring good income but then there is the dark side and at what cost ... this is a dilemma for all in the developing world who depend so heavily on the tourist dollar to survive ... very troubling ... we need to really look at diversifying the local economies.
Is the current financial crisis in US affecting the numbers tourist wise in the Caymans?

My fellow Canadians are bossy ... noooo ... internationally they are known for being friendly and peaceful! Could have that "holier than thou" attitude though ... they tend to take the high road which could be misleading. Smile

Today I had oven baked vegetables (potatoes, carrots, asparagus) with chicken ... all in the same pan ... turned out pretty good.


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Quote roslenmarle Replybullet Posted: 02 Feb 2008 at 2:17am
How about a Chicken Pelau from the beautiful island of St.Vincent and the Grenadines.
 
3 1/2 - 4 lb chicken , cut into serving pieces  2 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
Salt, freshly ground pepper to taste              3 Tbsp cooking oil
stock or water                                             4 oz butter
1 onion, finely chopped                               1 clove garlic chopped
3/4 lb rice                                                  1 can pigeon peas (cooked)
 
Methd:- Season chicken pieces with salt, pepper and Worcestershire sauce. Heat the oil in a large, heavy covered frying pan, and saute the chicken pieces until golden. Add stock or water to cover and simmer covered, until half done, about 15 minutes. Remove from heat, drain stock from pan and reserve it. Heat the butter in another skillet and saute the onion and garlic until brown. Add the rice and saute until all the butter is absorbed. Transfer to the skillet with the chicken add peas and add the reserved stock. Add enough extra stock or water to make the quantity up to 1 1/2 pints. Cover and cook until the rice is tender and all the liquid is absorbed. 
Serves 6. 
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